Cardigan Collection

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BroadAxe
BroadAxe
a large ax with a broad cutting blade. Used for cutting timber, and other pieces of wood used in shipbuilding
Captains Names
Captains Names
Captains names who sailed on Cardigan Vessels.
Cardigan Garage 1960
Cardigan Garage 1960
The Cardigan Garage, taken in 1960
Cardigan Garage LTD.
Cardigan Garage LTD.
Cardigan Garage taken in 1984
Cardigan in 1904
Cardigan in 1904
Cardigan circa 1904. A picture from one side of the bridge.
CardiganBridgePostCard
CardiganBridgePostCard
A postcard of the Cardigan Bridge from quite a few years ago.
Carmena's Diary
Carmena's Diary
The ship "Carmena" Diary
Carpenters Level
Carpenters Level
An instrument for ascertaining whether a surface is horizontal, vertical, or at a 45° angle, consisting essentially of an encased, liquid-filled tube containing an air bubble that moves to a center window when the instrument is set on an even plane.
Caulking Iron
Caulking Iron
A caulking iron is a tool used for caulking. Caulking - Traditional caulking (also spelled calking) on wooden vessels uses fibers of cotton, and oakum (hemp fiber soaked in pine tar). These fibers are driven into the wedge-shaped seam between planks, with a caulking mallet and a broad chisel-like tool called a caulking iron. The caulking is then covered over with a putty, in the case of hull seams, or else in deck seams with melted pine pitch, in a process referred to as paying.
Cecil Rice and Dan Acorn
Cecil Rice and Dan Acorn
Picture was taken down at the Cardigan Garage, year:unknown
Ceilidh picture
Ceilidh picture
A picture of a Ceilidh held somewhere in the Cardigan Area
Chronometer
Chronometer
A chronometer is a navigational tool used on sailing vessels to measure accurately the time of a known fixed location in order to determine the ship’s longitude. The angle between the sun and the horizon (or if taking a reading by night the angle of the stars above the horizon) determines the latitude – a measurement taken by a sextant another navigational tool but longitude is a more difficult measurement. To determine longitude the navigator needs to know the time difference between where they are standing and some other fixed point. In an hour the earth will rotate 15° (360° every 24 hrs) so if the time difference between you and a fixed point is 2hrs, then you know that you are 30° east or west of that point. In 1884 Greenwich, England became the official Meridian Line for all points around the Globe and GTM (Greenwich Mean Time) became the official time for the entire world. On knowing the latitude and longitude the navigator then goes to his nautical charts and using his parallel rule can pin point his exact position.

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